Browsed by
Month: August 2021

Myths around postpartum depression

Myths around postpartum depression

There are many myths around postpartum depression: some consider it to be ordinary fatigue, some do not believe in it at all. All these misconceptions only increase the feeling of guilt in women and prevent them from seeking help in time. Together with the authors of the project ” Take Care of Yourself “, they collected and refuted the most common myths about postpartum depression. The project is dedicated to supporting women who have faced difficult motherhood experiences. MYTH 1 : You’re just tired. REALITY: It is important to distinguish postpartum depression from parental burnout. Burnout occurs when a mother sets herself some tasks that clearly exceed her resources. It’s like trying to eat 5,000 rubles a month oysters . Such women are often brought in for counseling by anger. They come with a request: how to make them leave me behind. Women face emotions that are not theirs. They are frightened that they are no longer able to cope with the usual volume of duties, and angry that these duties will not end in any way. Burnout and depression are not two different universes; they flow into each other. But between these states there is an essential point. Rest helps a lot with burnout. If a woman has a sufficient amount of support from loved ones, she begins to move in this direction and gradually regains her strength. In depression, there is a feeling that nothing awaits ahead, a feeling of guilt in front of the child, suicidal thoughts. Rest, like everything else, seems pointless. MYTH 2 : You’re just sad. REALITY: There is such a thing as baby blues. Blues, apathy, mood swings, tearfulness are normal symptoms for the first three weeks after childbirth; they are in 80 % of women. Childbirth is a huge shock and restructuring of the body. Something incredible has happened to the body, and it needs time to comprehend and process it. This is a kind of ” stopping path ” of the body, a kind of ” hangover ” for the body. You can only tell the baby blues from depression over time. If symptoms persist for more than three weeks or worsen, it is best to discuss your emotional state with a specialist. MYTH 3 : If you are not lying face to wall, it is not depression. REALITY: Few mothers can afford the classic black melancholy. Nobody canceled baby care, remote work, cooking and other everyday life. A woman can be quite well-groomed, the apartment is cleaned, but often all this is done automatically. The only thing that gives the scale of confusion and chaos, in which she resides, – a very strong stress if something ide  ie not according to plan. All this anxiety in the form of contrasting thoughts, anxiety about the child, reflections on upbringing, feelings of guilt comes to the fore. MYTH 4 : If you take care of yourself beforehand, then the PRD will not happen. REALITY: Going to a therapist during pregnancy is a great experience, but alas, this does not guarantee the absence of postpartum depression. But by studying individual factors, vulnerabilities, and vice versa, supports, you can ” spread the straw ” in advance . It is important to be prepared for the fact that depression can happen, to notice in time that something is wrong, and to seek help. Usually, postpartum depression still begins gradually, and most often a woman has several risk factors at once: anxiety during pregnancy, experience of violence in childhood, traumatic experience of childbirth, discontinuation of medication, negative mood changes on the background of hormonal contraceptives, thyroid disorders glands, reproductive difficulties, abrupt weaning of the baby. But not always the reason is in the woman herself. Lack of support is a factor that every second has, social isolation, financial difficulties, emotional abuse from a partner often provoke postpartum depression. MYTH 5 : Postpartum depression won’t happen if all is well. REALITY: Reasoning in this way, we pay attention only to the external well-being of a woman: the support of loved ones, money, a comfortable life, the care of friends. But what about the internal supports? Does a woman know how to quickly adapt to new things? How did she imagine motherhood? Did her expectations come true? Does she know how to take care of herself and ask for help? Is it stable? Does she trust her feelings? How sensitive is it? MYTH 6 : You just don’t love your child. REALITY: Depression is not the opposite of love. It is a disease that develops gradually. Depression has many masks: some women seem to freeze, others have bouts of aggression. But the common thing in this is an endless space of guilt for not being able to give loved ones attention and warmth. Depression happens even to those who have wanted a child for many years. MYTH 7 : Postpartum depression goes away on its own. REALITY: No, and what’s more, it can drag on for months and years. Children whose moms were depressed have a higher risk of developing traumatic attachment, they are more difficult to calm down, and they cope less well with stress in adulthood. Postpartum depression is a disease that can and should be treated. The doctor may prescribe antidepressants and recommend psychotherapy. Psychotherapeutic support will help you find inner support and become more resilient.

Postpartum depression

Postpartum depression

According to statistics from the World Health Organization, every sixth woman suffers from postpartum depressive disorder. What is it and how to recognize it? How do you distinguish between normal sadness and depression and postpartum mood disorders? What is Postpartum DepressionPostpartum, or postnatal, depression is sometimes referred to as any mood disorder. However, according to statistics, from 10% to 20% of women face it. In a mild form, it looks like constant depression, apathy, lack of joy and the ability…

Read More Read More